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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off not sure if this is posted in the right spot if not please move it Otis.

Ok my question is pretty obvious but we're not talking about the bolts that hold the starter to the block I'm talking about the two long stud & bolt that hold the starter motor to the aluminum housing.
Now my buddy keeps telling me but its a brand new starter and my response is because its new doesn't mean its good. How many of us have put brand new parts in and had them not work raise you hand. Nothing other then a defective starter makes sense to me, how about you guys?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the starter works ok, just used med locktite. :tu
Yup thats what I suggested along with maybe having to Helicoil the housing. I have a starter out in the shop I told him to come by tomorrow take mine and see if it does the same thing which I can't see happening at least then he might believe me when I tell him new ain't always good.
 
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If this is a stock type Chevy large diameter starter, is the factory support bracket from one of the end bolts on the end cover, to block, in place??

If it is a mini-starter, small diameter, has a support bracket been made for the same end of the starter??

If not, do add the stock GM support bracket for the large starter, make one for the small one.

The bolts do a number if different jobs. They locate the starter in relation to the ring gear, they hold the starter against torque while starting, and, they hold that heavy lump in place when the vehicle is driven over all sorts of bounces in the road. LOTS of adversity for those bolts to overcome, and they need the support bracket at the other end of that heavy lump.
 

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I've never heard of those bolts coming loose. Since it's new, do you know they were ever tight?

The bracket that Dave mentioned is essential for all the reasons stated, also it prevents bending load on the starter nose housing. I've seen that housing break without one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Figured it out

Well it seems the 12 year old Chinese kid who was drilling the holes didn't drill them deep enough. Its a hi torque mini diameter starter first off. I happen to have one so I went over to his place and he already had his out I picked it up and yes the bolts were loose. So I reached for a wrench and tightened them up and it was as clear as mud there must have been a 1/16" gap from the motor body lets call it to the bolt-head. I looked at him over top of my glasses and just said Knucklehead and held it up so he could see it. We found a couple of washers and some red locktite and I told him now put this Chinese piece of junk back in. Hey I paid $185 for it. I pointed to mine and said that cost me more then twice that a few years ago. You get what you pay for. Well his starter works just fine for now any way
 
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The brackets were OEM from what I remember. If it had a stock large diameter stater, it had the bracket as well. All V8's came with them.

Mini-starters also need a bracket, and one can be fabricated easily.

Stock bolts are specially hardened, with a serration on their shank area to align the starter body straight on the block, so the gear interfaces with the ring gear straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The brackets were OEM from what I remember. If it had a stock large diameter stater, it had the bracket as well. All V8's came with them.
6 cylinders came with them also, one of my friends has a 55 210 with a 6 in it and his has it and I have a complete motor form a 57 that was out of my 54 Chevy and it has one as well.


Mini-starters also need a bracket, and one can be fabricated easily.

According to the instruction that came with my mini hi torque starter no bracket is necessary as the nose body comes with several holes in it for different "clock positions" for the solenoid. So if you have a clearance issue with say your headers you can actually flip the solenoid 180 degrees so it mounts on the bottom facing the road

Stock bolts are specially hardened, with a serration on their shank area to align the starter body straight on the block, so the gear interfaces with the ring gear straight.
Incorrect the knurling on Chevy starter bolts is to keep them from backing out or loosening up, the knurl actually is supposed to bite into or grip the aluminum housing. The bolts have a built in washer or "shoulder" hence no need for a flat or lock washer. On early Corvettes they had a cast iron nose and not aluminum. These were sought after buy hot rodders as they could take a lot more abuse then the aluminum ones.
 
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I worked at Chevrolet Engine Development, Special Pro0jects, for 4 years, under Duntov.

Respectfully, the knurling on stock GM starter bolts IS for alignment to the ring gear center line, and NOT designed to stop bolt back out.

YES, the knurling MIGHT, a very distant MIGHT help stop back out in some small way, but that isn't what it was added for. Consider that a bolt that "augers" its way in, as described above, will always lose its holding ability the first time it is removed, because the augering process REAMS metal out of a hole, and we all know a hole made bigger, will not ever get smaller by itself, not even when a brand new augering device (bolt) is installed.

So far, I have NEVER seen any recommendation from GM as to replace the bolts every time the starter is removed and replaced, only that the serrated bolts be used to ALIGN the starter, as outlined.

I have also NEVER seen any factory, nor aftermarket Chevy starter bolts that have an over sized serration on them, to "re-ream: the hole for a new, tighter fit, over the original bolt diameter.

That is FACT.
 

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Agree, the knurled bolts are for alignment.

In an indirect way, when everything is aligned with the correct bolts and the bracket on the end, nothing wants to move around, and this would lessen the bolt load, so indirectly they would have less of a tendency to loosen.
 
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Absolutely correct. Thanks, Rick.

I don't remember any serrated starter bolt I ever installed that needed to be hammered/tapped through its bore n the end frame, and that is what would have had to happen if the bolt augered its way into those frame holes.
 
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