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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey Guys - need some help here.
I just traded for a '56 Bel Air with an after-market transmission.
I crawled underneath and was surprised to see that there is no shroud or cover protecting the starter ring. I can see the screw holes where one is supposed to be attached. There is even what looks like a serial number on the facing where it is supposed to be attached.
Can anybody identify the type of transmission or where I might get a cover?
Thanks,
Rob

 

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The removable pan underneath indicates that its either a turbo 350/400 not a powerglide as they did not have a pan like that.

Heres some info:

1
Identify early cast-iron Powerglides by locating the word "Powerglide," stamped on the passenger side of the transmission. Another identification feature is that the cast-iron models have no pan on the bottom of the transmission. The cast-aluminum Powerglides have a removable square-pan on the bottom with 14 bolts, and are stamped with a source code instead of "Powerglide."

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Locate the source code on the passenger side of the transmission, just above the pan. According to Hemmings Motor News, pre-1967 codes were five or six digits long. The letter C identifies it as a Powerglide manufactured in Cleveland. The next number set identifies the date of manufacture (1115 for November 15th, etc.). The last letter identifies whether the transmission was built during the day or night shift (D or N). 1968-and-up source codes switched the code order and also gave the year manufactured. The month code was changed to a letter and the work-shift identification was dropped. A code reading T9C09 means it was built on March 9th, 1969 in Toledo.

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Identifying which car model a Powerglide came from is difficult. In the earlier years of the cast-aluminum Powerglide's, it is possible to narrow the model it came with by measuring the length. According to HotRodder.com, two sizes, 25-inch and 28-inch, were manufactured between 1962 and 1964. The 25-inch model was used with full-sized cars from 1962 to 1964 and the 28-inch model on Chevy II/Novas and trucks
From 1965 on, all powerglides were 28-inch models and were virtually all the same except for gear-ratio differences for six-cylinder engines, trucks and performance engines.



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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the detailed reply.

It is definitely not a Powerglide. I have a '57 with a Powerglide that has a nice big blue circle on it with the ID inside it.

From the bolt pattern on the pan, it appears to be a TH350. (http://www.maliburacing.com/auto_tranny_id.htm)

I was able to find the part I need online as a "flywheel dust cover" (http://www.jegs.com/p/Spectre/Spectre-Inspection-Covers/1128237/10002/-1) but I need to find out how to measure for the starter slot. Any hints from those with experience would be appreciated. Otherwise....I will be calling the company tomorrow.
Thanks,
Rob
 
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