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Whats the best product for repairing cracks in my 55 stock sterring wheel. Or is it better to buy one done and turn mine in to one of those places that recycles vintage car parts.
 

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I hope you get a good 'repair' answer because I'm going to be repairing mine one of these days and I'm just not sure how to go about it. Repaired or new ones seem so expensive.
 

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Repaired steering wheels are expensive because it is labor intensive, another job the car owner can and should do to save some bucks and be able to say "I DID IT". You will have to grind or bevel out each and every crack using a Dremel or whatever. Go to your local boat or marine shop and pick up some MarineTex, black or white, 2 part gooo. I like it because it sands at the same rate the material on your wheel will sand at and is tuff stuff. Apply in the grooved cracks, sand, sand, sand, shot some high build epoxy primer, sand. sand, sand, wet sand, dry, paint your favorite color. Lon

ps hint, once the MarineTex is applied and is semi hard, wet your finger and shape the goo to form around it's contours.
 

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I'm sure that Por-15 kit is good......but $90!!!!!! get the marine-tex.
alot cheaper and works great.
file, fill and sand.
prime, seal and paint.
No rocket science here, just time and patience and a little bit of skill.
Geoff
 

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Thanks for the great information. Now I have a reference for later.
 

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55delray i haven`t used one of the 15 inch wheels but the feedback on them that i`ve read stated they weren`t very good quality.
Terry
i see that you have to refinish them. i was curious thank god for this site. i hate buying stuff and not being happy with it. i think the stock wheel will look better anyways.
 

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Like someone else posted, it isn’t that hard, just takes time. Because my Nomad now has power steering I thought the old wheel would be to large. I also wanted to keep the "original" look to the wheel. So I found a "donor" wheel at a swap meet that was of a smaller diameter then the original. The rims are cut from the old and new wheels. The new rim is then fitted to the old hub and welded in place. The rim was then patched using PC-7 epoxy paste from Eastwood. The PC-7 is a slow cure epoxy that can be shaped easily. It took me 3 applications to patch the areas cut away to weld the 2 wheels together. I found that a Dremel works well to open up the cracks that need to be patched. After all the patching is done, primer and paint.
Good luck.
Jack
 

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I agree,the Marinetex is good stuff....That said,I have used the Eastwood kit and found it to work real well also_On the repro wheels.....I've looked at many at several shows around the country.....they all come from the same place,the wheel itself is pretty good(only comes in black) but the chrome on the horn ring etc is pretty bad and in my opinion,would need rechromed to suit me.Still running the stock wheel but as I "grow" it's beginning to get a little tight :p
 

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epoxy'll do it. I'll do it to the wheel on the 150 one of these days... which is so cracked I was afraid it would break, so I replaced it with something else not appropriate for the stock chevy room.

55/6 150s also have slightly different wheels stock... well it's the same wheel (2 spoke) but they only have a horn button, no ring or nothing.
 
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