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Sorry for the delay in posting what products and steps I took to seal my gas tank. Some of you know that I was having a problem with little blackish/red flakes clogging my fuel filters all the time. I had originally taken the gas tank and gas lines out and cleaned them. The tank looked good after I had cleaned it. I also replaced the strainer that attaches to the Sending unit, cleaned the sending unit up and blew some acetone through the gas line. This helped slow the amount of crud down, but I still had the same problem happening. Decided it was time to take the gas tank off again and seal it and just replace the gas line with a new one. I decided to go with RedKote (photo below) to seal the tank (http://www.4secondsflat.com/Fuel_Tank_Sealer.html ) I researched several products before choosing Red Kote. Napa had it in stock when I started calling around, which was a nice suprise. The instructions on the can are very clear and easy to follow. I was VERY pleased with the results for a first timer. The instructions say use one can for tanks of 12 gallons or less and two for larger tanks, but I ended up taking the second can back for a refund since one can was plenty to get the 16 gallon tank on my 57 Chevy completely coated with a good thick layer of sealant. You'll also need a degreaser to clean any gasoline residue out of the tank, a rust disolver to remove the loose rust, and I also got a couple cans of Acetone to dry the tank out with to make sure it was very dry before sealing(RedKote can also be thinned with Acetone and clean up is easy with it). I used a gel type of degreaser(sorry threw can away before I took photo) and used a bottle of Rust Kutter, purchased at Walmart for the rust disolver. To start with I emptied the bottle of Rust Kutter into the tank and dropped in a small piece of Logging Chain(see photos) to use as a scouring pad to break loose as much rust as possible. I took turns for each side of the tank and worked the chain back and forth by rocking the tank side to side like a see saw. Personally I allowed the chain to slide back and forth fifty times before I went on to the next side and repeated ( there were one or two rest stops before this was all done, it got mighty heavy). On the top and bottom of the tank I split the rocking into two parts half the top for fifity slides of the chain then tilted the tank and repeated with the other half of the top. Same for the bottom. After all this, I removed the chain and hosed out the tank well. Next I added the degreaser and allowed this to sit for about 15 minutes after shaking the tank to get the degreaser spread throughout the tank's interior. I rinsed the tank out again and added a can of acetone, sloshed this around to help dry the tank quickly(RedKote Sealant recommends to use acetone to help dry tank or let the tank air dry for 24 hours, 2 hours if you have forced air blowing through tank( as well as I remember) or 15 minutes with Acetone bath. I sealed the tank after removing the drain plug and putting a small wad of plastic sheeting in the hole(RedKote does not stick to plastics) to keep RedKote off the threads. I also taped up the hole where the sending unit is attached and the overflow hole next to the filler hole. After applying the RedKote Sealer and draining the excess as instructed, I left the tank resting on two saw horses with all holes opened to dry until the next day. The RedKote instructions say the two biggest problems they have had from customers have been the result of not allowing the tank to dry properly before sealing or not letting the sealant completely dry before reinstalling on the vehicle and filling the tank. Since I have installed a new fuel line and sealed the tank my filters have remained clean. Just thought I'd pass this along.

Steve


 

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Great explanation, Steve! Hope you don't mind if I try to simplify it a bit.

Products/Supplies

1. Piece of chain
2. Degreaser
3. Rust remover - 16 oz
4. Tank sealer (Red-Kote) - one quart
5. Acetone (2 cans)
6. Small piece of plastic sheeting
7. Tape (duct tape should work)

Procedure

1. Remove Gas Tank from Car (drain gas, take off sending unit, etc.)
2. Pour Rust remover into tank, put chain in tank, agitate completely
3. Remove chain, hose out tank with water
4. Pour degreaser in tank, coat inside of tank, wait 15 minutes, empty tank
5. Rinse tank with water, pour in acetone, slosh around, empty tank, wait 15 minutes for tank to dry
6. Put wad of plastic in drain hole to protect threads, tape up sending unit hole and overflow hole
7. Pour in can of Red-Kote, slosh around, pour off excess, let sit overnight

Simple and effective!!!

Could be made even simpler....

Remove Tank (drain gas, remove sending unit, etc.)
Prep Tank (remove rust, degrease, dry with acetone, fill holes with plastic/tape)
Seal Tank (one can of red-kote, pour out excess, let dry overnight)
 

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Steve -Sounds like a plan, I'll have to try it on some old military jerry gas cans that I have with a little rust in the bottom lip area. I wonder if it would work in the water cans as well.
 

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I'm going to contemplate doing this on the weekend. I can let it dry while I'm working on the fuel line.
 

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Hey guys this is an old thread but I've got my gas tank out and will be doing this procedure tonnight,,, Thanks for taking the time to post up great things like this!!!!

I was about to buy a new tank, now I'll use theat extra money for the disk brakes!!!!!:)
 

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I took my tank off and realized that it was trash so I replaced it -- $125 plus a new sending unit (I think I paid $40 for it) and then ran some new fuel lines to my new fuel pump and hooked that up to my newly rebuilt carburetor -- now it's all new and I don't have to worry about it!
 

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I took my tank off and realized that it was trash so I replaced it -- $125 plus a new sending unit (I think I paid $40 for it) and then ran some new fuel lines to my new fuel pump and hooked that up to my newly rebuilt carburetor -- now it's all new and I don't have to worry about it!
That’s what I did. The new tank looks great on both the inside and the outside and no more fuel problems. :tu:D
 
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