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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are some of the experiences of the 55 56 57 brotherhood and the evil ethanol added fuel these days. I have a 57 with an original in line six and I have had to rebuild my carb twice in three years and replaced a float as well. I am now using the rich mans grade 91 with no ethanol, as of fall of 2020. I am keeping a close eye on my motor to makes sure this makes any sense. By the way both times my carb was completely and properly rebuilt. I would like to hear some of the real world experiences on this matter. Cheers.
 

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If you have to run it, use stabilizer. I avoid it and find gas stations that sell non-ethonal.

You need a different carb and fuel lines to keep running corn.

Ethonal is inefficient and you burn more fuel and get less performance.

Note: this is not the same as E85.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Check out pure-gas.org. List all the gas stations by state that sell ethanol free gas.
I have been running Shell V 91 with no ethanol but the added expense is murder because I drive my oldies a lot. My oldies have never been dust bunny collectors and I average 4,000 miles a year on my 57. Because of the Covid-19 melt down, I am driving less but I hope that changes soon. Here in Ontario, Canada I am presently spending $1.45 and up a litre for this rich mans blend. I have been checking out lists of stations that carry non ethanol in Ontario and the pickings are very slim to say the least. I was hoping to retain my original Rochester one barrel carb but I may have to change it in the future because of the way the world is going. Can anyone recommend a one barrel replacement that is ethanol friendly. I keep hearing that one day soon ALL gas will have massive amounts of the evil ethanol, including all the premium 91 stuff. Cheers.
 

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I run regular gas in my stock 265. Haven’t had any issues and it’s been on the road for the last 8 years now. I did replace the fuel pump a few years ago as it was leaking but it was over 20 years old.
 

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The only thing in your carb that might not be ethanol proof is the carb plunger. Most of the ones you get in kits now are ethanol proof unless you get and old one that has been on the shelf a long time.
 

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No ethanol in the gas in New Zealand regardless of octane. We have 91 95 98 and 100 but our octane rating system is different so it's about 4 numbers high to be equivalent of Nth American octane numbers.
 
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If the carb needed rebuilding that often, either you don't drive it enough, or the kits they used were very old and not e-10 compatible. Or both and you really will have problems. Stabil fuel stabilizer should help with it sitting too long. I don't know if it would help, but I'd go heavy on the Stabil.
I haven't had a carb or fuel problem with E-10 yet and I've used it for quite some time. Even last summer? when I was doing some bodywork and didn't drive it for almost 3 months I had zero problems with E-10 and no Stabil.
I just don't get it. People cry and complain about it all the time and I've never had a problem with it. It was used back as far as 1918 to get some more mileage out of gasoline. Who knows how it worked then? Maybe the gas was so different that the mixture didn't do the harm that some people have problems with today?
When I lived up in PA, I'm pretty sure E-10 was available cheaper than pure gas in the early 80's and I was driving carbureted cars long after that. Never had a problem. Well wait, I did have a lot of problems with chain saws, they are all E-10 compatible now including ones with rebuilt carbs, new hoses, and new primer pumps. And even new gas caps that would swell from it.
 

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makes me want to go out and start my 56 up.
 

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I switched back to ethanol free a few months ago. I have been running a leather accelerator pump for about 3 years with ethanol and a stabilizer.

I switched back to non Ethanol due to hard start issues when the car is hot. Did help there. Will see what happens when summer gets here.

I have a thin phenolic spacer for the 2gc that I intend to install and run with the stock oil bath air cleaner in my 55.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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makes me want to go out and start my 56 up.
No, go out and DRIVE it! Take it out for a few hours. Hit a highway and just go anywhere (but for insurance reasons you were going to pick up 56 parts). Run the gas low and put some fresh stuff in it. Pretend that it's a car. ;)
 

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No problems here in California, I used 87 until I changed to 997 heads, now I'm forced to run 91 or the engine will ping. The only annoying thing is the amount of cranking needed to fill the floats on the dual 4 barrel carbs due to how quickly the gas evaporates if I let it sit more than a week.
 

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No problems here in California, I used 87 until I changed to 997 heads, now I'm forced to run 91 or the engine will ping. The only annoying thing is the amount of cranking needed to fill the floats on the dual 4 barrel carbs due to how quickly the gas evaporates if I let it sit more than a week.
An electric fuel pump will fix that. But if you run it with an oil pressure safety switch, you'll want to have a little primer button to make it pump before cranking at all. I shouldn't admit it, but I don't have a pressure safety switch on mine, so as soon as I turn the key the pump runs. It could be done with a timed relay that turns on the pump when you first turn the key, but it stops after 5 or so seconds. Then when it's running and has oil pressure the pump will keep running.

I like that I can let it sit for even a month, turn the key, give it less than one full pump, turn the key to crank, and in what seems like less than 1 revolution cranking, it fires up. Normally starts faster than my fuel injected vehicles.
 

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I think the biggest problem is letting ethanol fuel sit for months without driving, like over the winter. I have seen it gum up sometimes, othertimes not for whatever reason.

Example: I started my 1928 Ford up last week and that was on the small amount of 5 month old gas left in the tank. Started right up! Different than a 55 of course, they designed Model A's to run off of pure alcohol by farmers in who couldn't get gas.
 

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If you are using old fuel line and not fuel line rated for ethanol, it will eat the lines up over time. This is not speculation.

Something like this:
 

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If you are using old fuel line and not fuel line rated for ethanol, it will eat the lines up over time.
Exactly! And if you're not sure about what you have on your car, buy enough to replace it. Cheap insurance. A few years ago I opened the garage door where my '65 C-10 - a regular driver that almost never gives me any problems - is parked, and the smell of gas was alarming. The rubber lines on either side of the pump were nothing but sponge. Easily replaced - but a spark in that space would've been devastating. When I inspected the old hose, it had deteriorated from the inside out. Since then I use only Gates Barricade hose (Barricade® Carburetion Hose | Gates Corporation), for carbureted applicatioins.

If I'm taking one of my cars on the road and I know I'll burn it out, I'll use the cheaper gas. But I don't like to have it sit in the tank or the carb any more than necessary. There are a couple of places in town where I can get non-ethanol for around 30-40 cents/gallon more - it's worth it to me.
JR
 

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1957 Chevrolet Bel Air 2 Dr Hard Top
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If you are running ethanol and you let your car sit, you really should use stabilizer.
My dad restored a 57 Vette and put a brand new fuel tank in it. He only drives it about once a month so it sits for long periods. He was driving it and it started cutting out. Investigating it, the nylon sock had broken down and clogged the pick up and more investigating, the whole interior of the tank was rusted! It only took three years for ethanol to rust out the tank and completely brake down the nylon sock. He put in a new tank and only puts pure gas in it now.
 

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If the carb needed rebuilding that often, either you don't drive it enough, or the kits they used were very old and not e-10 compatible. Or both and you really will have problems. Stabil fuel stabilizer should help with it sitting too long. I don't know if it would help, but I'd go heavy on the Stabil.
I haven't had a carb or fuel problem with E-10 yet and I've used it for quite some time. Even last summer? when I was doing some bodywork and didn't drive it for almost 3 months I had zero problems with E-10 and no Stabil.
I just don't get it. People cry and complain about it all the time and I've never had a problem with it. It was used back as far as 1918 to get some more mileage out of gasoline. Who knows how it worked then? Maybe the gas was so different that the mixture didn't do the harm that some people have problems with today?
When I lived up in PA, I'm pretty sure E-10 was available cheaper than pure gas in the early 80's and I was driving carbureted cars long after that. Never had a problem. Well wait, I did have a lot of problems with chain saws, they are all E-10 compatible now including ones with rebuilt carbs, new hoses, and new primer pumps. And even new gas caps that would swell from it.
My 57 sat for 11+ months when it wouldn't start one weekend and I was working out of town. I added a liberal amount of Stabil to the tank about 2 months in, but obviously didn't get any in the carburetor. When I got the time to diagnose the original Coil failure, the 4 gc overflowed and fluid locked the engine. The carburetor looked like someone had poured a cup of white tile grout in it. The accelerator pump leather had been ripped off and all the passages were plugged solid. The bottom of the bowl looked like spalled concrete when I dug it out. It ate the aluminum and hardened like mortar. One of our members here GAVE me a carburetor that happened to have a new leather accelerator pump and perfect bowl. No hesitation on takeoff or corrosion with non ethanol since then.
 
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