Chevy Tri Five Forum banner

21 - 40 of 74 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,830 Posts
Other then the mountains, does it ever snow anyplace in California??, thanks, Carmine.
Once in every 15 or 20 years it will snow in the Central Valley. It’s usually only 1 or 2 inches though, and is most all melted off by the next day. When it does it’s a real novelty. I think it would be pretty darn rare where Bob lives because of the powerful influence of the Pacific Ocean. He lives a lot closer to the ocean than I do.

There’s also some at times in the north coastal hills, also on the ‘desert’ area east of those hills far north in this state, and not to mention the snow that happens in the southern mountains also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
Other then the mountains, does it ever snow anyplace in California??, thanks, Carmine.
Only on some very rare occasions. Normally snow line is at about 1200 to 1800 ft elevation. Where I live in the Bay Area elevation is a little above sea level. Elevation in parts of SoCal is down to about 120 feet below sea level. My Dad who was born there 99 years ago still remembered when it snowed there sometime in the 1930's.
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,240 Posts
The desert SE corner of CA, and SW corner of AZ is a mecca for "snowbirds" in Winter but it gets hot as hell in Summer. I was raised there, but left after high school and never went back except to visit my folks until 21 years ago when I moved part of my business down there. It was an excellent move and my company has done well there. Every year I try to pay a little bit back. Last year I had my company contribute to three support groups that help the homeless, and abused women's shelter and their children. When it gets cold (30's) they open up shelters for them. I don't know what would happen to these people if the temps dipped to what Texas is going through right now. They may be out in the street through no fault of their own. I imagine Texas has similar issues and I wonder how those people pushing grocery carts and living under tents or cardboard shelters are surviving this storm. I hope someone is giving them a helping hand, or a coat, or a blanket,
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Having lived there for almost 30 years, I only experienced one time where we had this kind of weather. Most of the problems are a result of building codes that do not require pipes to be buried 6 feet deep to avoid the frost line. Inside pipes are not insulated and most are in outside walls with little or poor insulation. It is hard to convince people to spend the $$$ for these things when it may happen once in a 50 year span. Most all of what has happened is a perfect storm of events, all never planned for.

We up north plan for the cold and freezing temps for long periods. Still many in my parts don't have AC in their homes. Try and find a home in Texas, built in the past 50 years that DOES NOT HAVE CENTRAL AC.

Mikey
we live in county have water wells im always looking at weather fore cast several weeks ahead and stock up on winter stuff in summer insulation we were fine with water till monday morning lost power at 2 am .but we had filled both bath tubs up with water have a genset and power inverters son and his family are staying with us also have a fire place power has always been subject to go out where i live
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Here in N. Texas we have freezes and usually some snow every year. Normally no ones pipes freeze and power is reliable. We have had weather nearly this cold a few times in the past and also power outages but not at the same time. We have had lots of cases ice breaking power lines but those often come at just barely below freezing temperatures in rain conditions. This time with the record cold and almost statewide power outages at the same time it was a disaster. There are dozens of articles about what went wrong so I won't repeat them. Other than a huge wreck in Fort Worth at the start of this mess roads weren't really that much of a problem. They say Texans can't drive on the snow but that's really not true (at least for North Texas) since we usually deal with ice and its a lot worse than snow.

We live in a small house built in 71 that we bought in 73. It has copper pipes which will burst a lot easier than pex so we are very fortunate that we didn't have any burst. The only thing that froze was the lines to the washer and we caught them early and a small space heater had it working in a few minutes. Our town has its own power distribution and somehow they never cut power to anyone. We also have a wood stove and can keep our living room & kitchen dining area as warm as we want and thanks to last springs tornado we have a lot of wood. We were very fortunate!

Family wasn't quite as lucky my daughter who has 5 girls lives10 miles away had the rolling blackout thing. Her husband stayed home and managed to heat the house enough when they did have power to keep the pipes & well thawed. The rest came to our house so we had 6 extra women here. Wow they can go through a lot of hot water & toilet paper. Sister in Dallas had the same problems but everyone is fine and people are starting to get power back at least more of the time. I have friends in the Fort Worth area that really suffered and some had power completely off for 3 days.

We are starting to hear about way too many deaths from carbon monoxide and freezing so if anything ever happens like this where you are please be safe!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,830 Posts
Here in N. Texas we have freezes and usually some snow every year. Normally no ones pipes freeze and power is reliable. We have had weather nearly this cold a few times in the past and also power outages but not at the same time. We have had lots of cases ice breaking power lines but those often come at just barely below freezing temperatures in rain conditions. This time with the record cold and almost statewide power outages at the same time it was a disaster. There are dozens of articles about what went wrong so I won't repeat them. Other than a huge wreck in Fort Worth at the start of this mess roads weren't really that much of a problem. They say Texans can't drive on the snow but that's really not true (at least for North Texas) since we usually deal with ice and its a lot worse than snow.

We live in a small house built in 71 that we bought in 73. It has copper pipes which will burst a lot easier than pex so we are very fortunate that we didn't have any burst. The only thing that froze was the lines to the washer and we caught them early and a small space heater had it working in a few minutes. Our town has its own power distribution and somehow they never cut power to anyone. We also have a wood stove and can keep our living room & kitchen dining area as warm as we want and thanks to last springs tornado we have a lot of wood. We were very fortunate!

Family wasn't quite as lucky my daughter who has 5 girls lives10 miles away had the rolling blackout thing. Her husband stayed home and managed to heat the house enough when they did have power to keep the pipes & well thawed. The rest came to our house so we had 6 extra women here. Wow they can go through a lot of hot water & toilet paper. Sister in Dallas had the same problems but everyone is fine and people are starting to get power back at least more of the time. I have friends in the Fort Worth area that really suffered and some had power completely off for 3 days.

We are starting to hear about way too many deaths from carbon monoxide and freezing so if anything ever happens like this where you are please be safe!
Seems that the polar air is moving out of this nation so your troubles should be over soon. Keep er warm for a little bit longer.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
64,811 Posts
Hope you are keeping safe, the news reports here are showing grime weather, stock up and plan ahead in case this weather blocks you folks in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Just saw on the early morning news, they predict more cold, snow and power outages for Texas. OMG. Enough is enough. I hope this ends soon for all. Stay safe, Carmine.
 

·
Trifive Certified Restoration Shop
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
Water lines don't need to be buried deep. Most of the pipes bursting are in attics or walls. Many of them could be insulated but aren't. And most wouldn't burst if the power hadn't gone out.
You are partially correct Rick. Having lived in the north where it gets sub zero for weeks at a time yes, the water pipes do need to be buried deeper than in the south. Every year we have at least one underground water pipe somewhere in the city here that bursts and they're buried 8-10 foot down and are heavy walled piping.

The pipes in the houses are not all insulated around here either. Most places the pipe run under the floor and up through the floor. Most newer homes around here have basements which helps them dramatically over the older homes like mine that were built in the 30's and 40's with no basement. The water pipes for these homes run through the attic and down the wall (sometimes an outside wall) like mine does. Every winter I have to leave the kitchen sink doors wide open to get enough heat to the pipes to keep them from freezing, but when it hits the low teens or single digits here I have to remove everything from under the sink, place a space heater in that cabinet and close the doors with just a crack to let fresh air in (usually a folded dish towel is enough) and pointed directly at the pipes of the outside wall to keep them warm enough not to freeze up.

Yes it happened here already this year and it was overnight ( 20's all day and dropped to single digits over night. The water worked at 9 pm when I filled the Dogs' water jug, but by 6 am the next morning the water was frozen. It took 38 hours with the heater on those pipes to thaw them out enough for water to flow again, and the space heater has been continuously on since Feb 7th. I can imaging my electric bill for this moth being double what it normally is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,005 Posts
I work in the electric utility business from the supply side... just found out all LTL shipments into Texas are "on hold"... as if it couldn't get any worse, well it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Yes, I certainly feel for the folks in Texas. Both of my adult sons live in the Dallas area and have had to deal with frozen pipes and power outages. We had our share of troubles in Iowa this past August with the Derecho Storm. Most of us had not even heard the term Derecho until after it was all over. We still have disaster recovery trucks in town cleaning up brush piles from losing 60-80% of the trees in our area. The storm actually knocked out my generator and we were without power four 14 days and without internet service for 34 days. Most of us are still dealing with repairs to our roofs, siding, windows and fences as even with the flood of out of town contractors in town, there's not enough of them to get the repairs done. And some people's homes are still not inhabitable after taking direct hits from large old trees. These winds peaked at 142 MPH in our area. I don't recall what category of hurricane that is equivalent to, but unlike most hurricanes, we only had 41 minutes notice that this was coming to prepare. Most of the body/shop collision centers in town are still backed up due to derecho storm repairs. Now we are faced with probably a record snowfall amount in our area and are not looking forward to what could amount to being record flooding, (again). We already had our "300 year" flood event in Cedar Rapids in 2008.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,206 Posts
I live in Henderson County, Texas. Our power went out about 2am Monday morning, came back on last night about 10pm.
Almost 90 hrs. My wife and I toughed it out as long as we could. We left Wednesday morning for my sisters home next town over, she had power. The back country roads between me and her were packed with snow and ice yesterday. Today coming back home, the roads were worse. Back home safe, still no water but happy to have power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
I live in Henderson County, Texas. Our power went out about 2am Monday morning, came back on last night about 10pm.
Almost 90 hrs. My wife and I toughed it out as long as we could. We left Wednesday morning for my sisters home next town over, she had power. The back country roads between me and her were packed with snow and ice yesterday. Today coming back home, the roads were worse. Back home safe, still no water but happy to have power.
I'm glad you are doing better now. They are saying that the roads tomorrow are going to be far worse here after it thaws a little then refreezes. We now have only a little trickle of water but it should come back by tomorrow and then we will have to boil for a day. We have a Berkey water filter we have used for years but will still boil for a day. Going to melt some snow to flush with incase the trickle of water we have now quits like most of the town has done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
Was chatting with my brother in Corpus Christi, and his power has been out since Sunday. Not at any risk from a safety stand point, but pretty frustrating, especially since the power outages were “planned” to protect the grid and infrastructure.
Apparently the mayor’s house was not part of the plan, and has suffered no outages 🤔
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
I just read that 60% of homes in Texas are electric heated. Nationwide, it's 36%. I'm guessing when it started to get cold, the demand increased and contributed to the problem. The author of the article also mentioned that whoever designed this grid pattern and the way to power it, was very short sighted. They use wind power and never allowed for continued freezing temperatures. They could have installed some type of blade heating device but never did. They compared the same wind turbines or whatever they are called, to the ones in Minnesota and they never have a problem there because of the heated blades. I know this doesn't help the problem in Texas, but thought it was interesting. I hope all continue to stay safe and the end of this disaster is close, Carmine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just read that 60% of homes in Texas are electric heated. Nationwide, it's 36%. I'm guessing when it started to get cold, the demand increased and contributed to the problem. The author of the article also mentioned that whoever designed this grid pattern and the way to power it, was very short sighted. They use wind power and never allowed for continued freezing temperatures. They could have installed some type of blade heating device but never did. They compared the same wind turbines or whatever they are called, to the ones in Minnesota and they never have a problem there because of the heated blades. I know this doesn't help the problem in Texas, but thought it was interesting. I hope all continue to stay safe and the end of this disaster is close, Carmine.
this was a weather event that just does not happen? and texas population is growing very fast just means we need to start updating things . what made this bad a lot of so called good areas had power and outlying places had no power . i had no power for 3 days but we were prepared with powerplant and supplies had water " we lose power in winter sometimes but we are ok
 
21 - 40 of 74 Posts
Top