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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I’m lucky that my 56 150 has no rust issues, but I’m in the process of welding up a number of holes that were drilled in the floors. Example: A few of the holes are about 1/2” in diameter and were drilled for mounting bolts for lap belts. (I am putting in 3 point seat belts later and will drill new holes)

How would you weld up several 1/2” holes in floor sheet metal. Btw, my car is on a rotisserie and turned at a 90* angle, so access is easy.

I’m thinking about using small elevator bolts or something like that to help plug the hole when welding, then grinding off the excess.
 

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If you have a MIG close the holes with weld or hold a #8 or #10 flat washer etc in place with a magnet & weld.
 

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I've never seen a prepackaged kit of hole fill plugs like that, that's a great buy. Think how long it would take you to do this even if you had the punches, or to cut a few using snips.

I would get the 18 gauge plugs they offer, not the 14 gauge shown. Much closer to the thickness of what you'll be welding.

5/16" or smaller holes can be welded without a plug, just use a copper backing plate.
 

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It would be better to use 18 gauge steel, easier and better end results. Or if you have scrap Vintage parts that you can cut pieces for plugs.

I prefer prefer to fab my plugs. I clamp a small piece of 18 gauge in the drill press and use a Hole Saw. Cut ID close but smaller than the hole ID being plugged. Use a Clearance Gap, If You fit the plug too tight, that can often result in metal expansion resulting in a high spot or buckle.

I Remove the Hole Saw pilot bit to cut plugs. This is a bit tricky, low speed, cutting oil and go slowly !! AS when drilling on a drill press, Keep You Hand Clear!! I find using a wood 2x6 inch backing block clamp to the drill press works well for me.

TIG & MIG Do Not like Magnetic Fields, as mentioned use a Non-Ferris metal blocking plate, Copper or Brass.

TIG & MIG, both work well for wleding plugs. It's easy with TIG welding to add to much Wire. Practice with scrap pieces usually helps me when I haven't welded for weeks or months, and particularly when moving from steel members to thin sheet metal.

There's also good Videos available. I look for professionals, Mr TIG is one.

Good Luck,

Michael..
 

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I would get the 18 gauge plugs they offer, not the 14 gauge shown. Much closer to the thickness of what you'll be welding.

5/16" or smaller holes can be welded without a plug, just use a copper backing plate.
I prefer the plug fits snugly the welds shrink as they cool and this eliminates shrinkage dents

I use this for most holes even if I have a piece to put in the hole just makes for a much cleaner easier job.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Plug-Magnetic-Weld-Tool-With-Copper-Alloy-Pad-Aide-And-Speed-Up-Welding-Holes/333024144238?hash=item4d89c92b6e:g:DqwAAOSwdxFcQ03A

I use this on long seams
https://www.ebay.com/itm/MAGNETIC-PLUG-WELD-TOOL-W-2-5-Long-Copper-Pad-Parallel-to-mag-base-VIM-MPWT2L/261233318279?hash=item3cd2b81987:g:c1IAAOxyYYlRwkld:sc:USPSPriorityFlatRateBox!93561!US!-1
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've never seen a prepackaged kit of hole fill plugs like that, that's a great buy. Think how long it would take you to do this even if you had the punches, or to cut a few using snips.

I would get the 18 gauge plugs they offer, not the 14 gauge shown. Much closer to the thickness of what you'll be welding.

5/16" or smaller holes can be welded without a plug, just use a copper backing plate.

I thought it was a great buy and agree about the 18 gauge, too.
:tu
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It would be better to use 18 gauge steel, easier and better end results. Or if you have scrap Vintage parts that you can cut pieces for plugs.

I prefer prefer to fab my plugs. I clamp a small piece of 18 gauge in the drill press and use a Hole Saw. Cut ID close but smaller than the hole ID being plugged. Use a Clearance Gap, If You fit the plug too tight, that can often result in metal expansion resulting in a high spot or buckle.

I Remove the Hole Saw pilot bit to cut plugs. This is a bit tricky, low speed, cutting oil and go slowly !! AS when drilling on a drill press, Keep You Hand Clear!! I find using a wood 2x6 inch backing block clamp to the drill press works well for me.

TIG & MIG Do Not like Magnetic Fields, as mentioned use a Non-Ferris metal blocking plate, Copper or Brass.

TIG & MIG, both work well for wleding plugs. It's easy with TIG welding to add to much Wire. Practice with scrap pieces usually helps me when I haven't welded for weeks or months, and particularly when moving from steel members to thin sheet metal.

There's also good Videos available. I look for professionals, Mr TIG is one.

Good Luck,

Michael..
Thanks. Great ideas!
I was thinking I could just open the holes up a tiny amount with a uni-bit to make a little room for expansion when welding.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Cool tools.

I do have a bit of difficulty getting to the backside of the floor because the doors and windows are still in place, but I have great access to the bottom.

I already minitubbed it and put in the Earl Williams spare tire filler, so it’s just a matter of filling these holes and doing a little tidying up.
 

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