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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Fifteen year 55

Here is my truck my dad bought me for $500 15 years ago. We tore it all down to the chassis. We have the bed parts on order from Jim Carter's. we are going with pine and stainless strips. A lot of sanding is in my future!



 

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Welcome, looks like a nice truck. Looks like you have the old stove fired up. Watching the weather it's been cold and rainy down your way. Nothing like a good project with weather like that outside. Ron
 

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I'd really reconsider on the pine wood. Pine is a "soft" wood and damages very easy. Walnut is a little more costly but worth it. or really most any hard wood. :anim_25:
:gba:
bowtie-trifive
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pining

I was thinking the same thing. It is supposed to be a much "harder pine". I want to keep it close to stock look, but work better!! I will be using it as a everyday driver once comlpeted so the bed will be filled often. They offer a oak as well. It is a budget build.... by budget I mean sell the stuff on those shelves to get cash for parts. But I dont want to replace it anytime soon either.
 

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I have a '56 F-100 and recently refinished the bed. I would recommend if you are planning upon using the pine(or any other wood) to not put a varnish type finish on it but use a hand rubbed tung and linseed oil product, numerous coats both sides, followed by a marine wood sealer.
I was a blue water sailor for 20 years and my wife and I had a traditional boat with lots of wood. Over the years we found no matter how well we finished the wood with a varnish or epoxy finish it always at some point started peeling somewhere. We finally stripped all the finishes to bare wood and used a marine grade oil finish. It lasted a long time,even in the tropics and the constant rain of Washington state, gave a nice sheen to the wood and was easy to touch up when needed.
On my truck bed(oak) I stripped all the finish, lightly sanded and prepped the surface. Then I used a marine product Interlux Premium Teak Oil for about 6 coats, followed by 3 coats of Swedish Fin-Oil and 1 coat of Interlux 1026 Inter-Prime Sealer.
The bed has a nice sheen(the more you rub it the better sheen) to it, not glossy and best of all it will be easy to touch-up if/when the surface starts looking bad. These finishes even though they say 'teak oil' are good for all woods, and you can add a tint to it if desired to change the color of the wood. I added about an ounce of 'black walnut' gives the wood a nice darker look rather than natural oak.
A friend of mine in Washington with a '56 GMC that he has owned for nearly 20 years, recommended that I use a spray-on undercoating on the bottom of the bed wood as he did when he built his truck and he has no rot so far. So I followed his advice on that.
Yet if you want that nice glossy finish go for it...
 

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they come apart so easy...
:anim_25: on your build. And remember; you said it was going to be an everyday-er. :)
 

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That looks like a good project. Are you restoring it to original specs or are you tricking it out. Saw some neat pick ups on the Barrett Jackson last night. :anim_25:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the positive feedback guys, and there are a many options for treating the wood. I was thinking of doing the under coat and just sealing it.

But plans are get the wrecked 99' camaro with the ls1, swap the tranny for a t-56. Rubbed down satin black over the Harley orange. And then put a million miles on her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Third day of work

I Just realized that it should all be on one thread.

OK, Another great day working with my dad on the 55.
We bought a rick of wood to kill the chill.
Cleaned up the shop a bunch, got the welders rearranged, mig and arc. Lucky us right?!!

Even cleaned up the work bench!!!!....see pics

We measured out the front end for the clip we are going to use. I leveled everything out set a 400 ci gto motor to compress the spring and added more weight to find the forward most point that the front axel travels. We will add one inch to that to have the new clip compressed at.

Dad measured one side and I measured the other. We were withing a 1/16th inch of each other .Not too shabby! Come to find out the body mounts are not perfectly the same on both side. They are between a 1/16th and an 1/8th. seems good enough to me. We measured everything else that we are going use.

Removed the whole front suspension.

We got a ton of practice cutting bolts with the torch. But I am still pretty mediocre.

But we got the entire bed completely disassembled. We will have to replace the rear sill and the cross supports will be replaced. And a new tail gate we lost the old one some how.

Dad wants to get the body sand blasted. The guys are not using a plastic medium. Its makes me nervous that they are going to warp it. I have seen that, and its bad. They said they don't do the roof and a couple other areas that are real thin. Any thoughts?

Monday we are going to look at a 81 el camino to see if it fits.

Here is a couple pics.

PS. I stop between parts to sweep the floor. I cant stand having a mess to step over. Takes up a lot of time but keeps up productive when we are working.





 
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