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I have a Lincoln Welder which I upgraded to sheilded gas. I have been using
the wire that was recommended to me when I got the bottle. I have read
on the net at various sites of JW Harris wire being easier to work with and
easier to grind when working on body panels. So far my welding has been
on the floor pans and patches that won't be seen. I'm working on a 57 2
door hard top 210, but have all the stainless and trim to make it a clone
belair. Any comments, suggestions on wire and or gas being used would be
much appreciated.
ShadetreeMech
 

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I use Lincoln brand wire in my Lincoln welders. .024 with gas and .030" flux core without gas. I have used a cheaper offshore brand with poor results.

I haven't tried many different kinds, that brand works great for me, so I have no reason to change.
 

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I bought what they call Easy-Grind and it was a letdown, I could not see any differences in grind time, what a waste of extra money you have to pay, made or sold by ESAB which I dont think they even sell it anymore
 

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Hi Guys
I have used 70s for ever and have not swaid off . Soft grind and what have you never seem to make any difference . I was at a Metal Shaping Meet and guys all said the same thing 70s is the the one they use all they change is size wire to match the job. This is however just my opinion but if somoe one out there know's something that works better please chime in and let us know. :D
 

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all & all what size wire?

steve, all & all on 18 gauge steel, what's your preference .024 or .030 . your input speek's volumes. Darren.
 

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I have used some expensive MIG wire ($60 per 10 pound roll) and also some cheap wire ($19 per 10 pounds) from Harbor Freight. I can't tell the difference. Both are ER70S-6 wire, same alloy.

"The most common types of MIG wire for welding mild steel are ER70S-3 and ER70S-6. These wires are designed to meet minimum tensile strength requirements of 70,000 psi. But which one is best for a particular application?

ER70S-3 is typically used on clean, oil-free and rust-free base material. It is also the best choice for avoiding silicon islands, which can sometimes form on the top of the weld, giving it a “glassy” look. Paint applied over a silicon island may later flake off. In addition, with multiple pass welding, a silicon island may be detected on an x-ray as a slag inclusion. Such defects may require costly rework.

Choose an ER70S-6 wire for welding on plate that has mill scale or surface contaminants, since this wire incorporates the proper deoxidizer to combat these issues. A deoxidizer absorbs oxygen so that it vaporizes into the arc or forms as scale oxides. ER70S-6 is also better for creating a smooth transition from the weld to the base metal, also known as wash-in or tie-in. Better wash-in may be a requirement in applications subject to fatigue. ER70S-6 wire can provide better wetting at the weld toe when compared to an ER70S-3 wire."
 

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Choose an ER70S-6 wire for welding on plate that has mill scale or surface contaminants, since this wire incorporates the proper deoxidizer to combat these issues. A deoxidizer absorbs oxygen so that it vaporizes into the arc or forms as scale oxides. ER70S-6 is also better for creating a smooth transition from the weld to the base metal, also known as wash-in or tie-in. Better wash-in may be a requirement in applications subject to fatigue. ER70S-6 wire can provide better wetting at the weld toe when compared to an ER70S-3 wire."
Would it be safe to say then that the ER70S-6 is the wire of choice for patch panels using either the .023 or .035 of choice.
 

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Would it be safe to say then that the ER70S-6 is the wire of choice for patch panels using either the .023 or .035 of choice.
For sheetmetal work I would only use the .023" wire. The bigger you go the harder it is to melt it, and the more heat you end up with in the panel. Like I said, I've tried the expensive stuff and the cheaper Chinese stuff, and to me they weld and grind the same. I hav the roll of Chinese wire in the MIG now and just finished replacing both quarter panels with it.
 

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Thank You Chevynut, ER70S-6 .023 for patch panels, .035 for heavier duty welding using the ER70S-6 sound like a good starting point then?
 

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Thank You Chevynut, ER70S-6 .023 for patch panels, .035 for heavier duty welding using the ER70S-6 sound like a good starting point then?
I have never used anything bigger than .023". We've even used .023 on 1/8" steel and it works well. Most wire you see out there is ER70S.....even my TIG rod is ER70S.
 

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Headed to HF only to find that they did not have any .023 wire except in the 2lb roll, asked the guy in the store if they would be getting any wire in the .023 10lb roll and was told what you see is what you get, so i asked him could i request a order at the store and pick it up at the next shipment and was told they could not do that and to just use what was on the shelf:stupido3: all righty then i said to myself:rolleyes: so i asked if i could possibly order it online and pick it up at the store, and got a reply yes you could do that and it would probably save you on the shipping:y::confused0006: Hmmm something not adding up here:rolleyes: so i guess that i will try on-line to order it (wire) anyone else ever do this online ordering with harbor freight.
 

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I agree on the ER70S, It is $10.00 for the small roll at Home Depot and that is all I use since I converted to MIG.
 
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