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1957 Bel Air sport sedan
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You master welders out there, I need some advice. I am going to get that metal cut to fabricate the ends of that center brace, but before I get it cut I need to consider how I am going to weld it. Since I do not have access to a metal brake large enough to bend 12 ga steel, I will get it cut into flat sections and weld it together at the edges. There are two different ways I can get the steel cut for the different welds, but which do you think would be stronger, top or bottom?



I would assume the strongest weld would be the top one, and even stronger with a second weld along the inside of the two pieces.

Thoughts?
 

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Eldon, agree with the top picture and with MP+C, tack and clamp securely, or your nice 90 degrees will find its way to 110

Been there, then you gotta cut and start over..

Gil
 

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1957 Bel Air sport sedan
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I plan on building a jig and clamping it into place, but I assume initial tack welds at the corners would be in order? Would it make any sense to run a bead along the inside, even though I should get good penetration from the first one? I just want these to be rock solid since they do most of the supporting for the rear door uprights.
 

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Eldon, agree with the top picture and with MP+C, tack and clamp securely, or your nice 90 degrees will find its way to 110

Been there, then you gotta cut and start over..

Gil
 

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Based on what you're doing I don't think you need to worry that much about strength of the weld. I'll almost bet that on 12 gauge you get full penetration anyway...if you have the welder set up right. Are you sure the brace is 12 gauge? That seems awfully thick. I could see 14 gauge (.075"), but not 12 (.105"). I know none of my floor braces were anywhere near 12 gauge.

I would do the top method too, though. ;)
 

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When you do it with the top method, and with a piece of angle or some other way to hold it in place, then try to weld the inside corner - the inside welding is going to try to pull that 90º angle inward. If it's square with good penetration after the first weld, just leave it alone.
 

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1957 Bel Air sport sedan
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep on the 12 ga, it is actually 13 ga, but I might as well go a one step up as they are supporting more than a normal brace would. It measured 0.090 average every place I took a measurement with the thinnest part at 0.085, and there was some grinding I had done there to pull out a spot weld.
 

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1957 Bel Air sport sedan
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When you do it with the top method, and with a piece of angle or some other way to hold it in place, then try to weld the inside corner - the inside welding is going to try to pull that 90º angle inward. If it's square with good penetration after the first weld, just leave it alone.
Sounds good, will do that. I wish they made repops of these, but apparently there is not enough of us sport sedaners out there to justify the parts. :D
 

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Eldon- If you going to have the peices sheared up, then just have the sheetmetal shop put the bends in them.

but if you still going to weld them up- if you use the top diagram and not grind the edge into a nice raduis then this method is fine. be careful if using the angle iron as a backer since you may weld to it at the worst spot possible.
If you want a nice smooth raduis then I would use the second method, just "vee" the top area on both pieces down to about 65% of depth, this will allow to get full penatration and allow you to grind a nice raduis into the base metal without grinding into the weld bead. If full pentration then you should have a nice looking bead on the inside also

Later
Mig
 
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