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Hey Pro Street, I hear your the man to go to with body work/ metal ?'s. I took my 55 210 post car down to bare metal, well just one door so far and what I found were bb sized holes all over the door. 56 holes to be exact, and I am not sure how to repair it w/o replacing the door skin. I am very new at body work but very eager to repair this myself. I have heard a few suggestions like brazing, new skin, glassing it, bondo, and the list goes on. With so many options I am reluctant to do anything. For a ( a novice) at metal work or repair what do YOU suggest I do? How do I fix these scattered holes? They were fiiled with either bondo or filler, I never knew they were there till I took the door down to bare metal with 80 gr sand paper. Is 80 gr sandpaper what I should be using to get the car down to bare metal? I would appreciate your help and advice.

Thanx
Jason
 

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If they are not rust holes, use a mig welder, .024 wire with co2 gas shielding. Get a piece of sheet metal about the same gauge as the door and drill the same size holes in it as the damaged door and practice welding them up. I would recommend putting a small nickel size piece of sheet metal backing behind each hole, have someone hold it in place with a dowel rod or round piece of bar steel while you weld it. This is called backing the weld. Welding an open hole even with a mig is difficult even for an experienced welder. Take your time and let cool between filling each hole and hold a damp rag to the surrounding metal to prevent warpage. The bondo or filler will have to be drilles out of the holes for the metal must be perfectly clean in order to obtain a spot weld with out porosity. Skip around on the door and try not to weld to many holes in the same spot, again to control warpage and distortion. Grind each spot smooth again carefull not to grinder burn the metal and keep the heat down here also, long sections of sheet metal can be heat warped with with a grinder. Brazing or any type of oxyacetylene gas welding will put to much heat into the panel and warp it. If you do not own a Metal Inert Gas Welding machine, "MIG", I suggest buying one of the home/garage units that run off 115 volts. Miller Electric and Lincoln make some fine small machines, watch the off brand stuff as you will need to obtain mig tips, cups and liners from time to time. A local welding supply house will always have consumables for these machines. An auto darkening hood is very benificial to a beginner, you can clearly see the spot you intend to weld and then it will auto darken when you pull the gun trigger, "initiate the arc". When under 75 amps you may be able to set the lens to 8 or 9 in order to see the weld puddle better. I am assuming that you will be able to take the door panels off and the glass out in order to get behind the holes to place the backing.
 

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PS..even if these are rust holes you can drill them out oversize until you are out of the rust area and into good base metal and weld them up using the above process. I weld up to 1/4" holes with backing often. You just can't weld rust, have not figured out how to do that yet. I can weld everything but the crack of dawn, a broken heart or rust...a little welder's humor there,"very little". If you intend to do a lot of sheet metal work, get yourself a mig, it will be a valueable tool for your garage, well worth the time and effort invested learning to use one.
 

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Hi Jason
Hmmmm 56 holes ????? Maybe they were related to Bonnie and Clyde!! :D
While there are many ways to repair this and one being the way Coupe55 described, with as many holes in that panel repairing them individually the door will suffer fatigue from heating cooling and grinding . Not to mention the great amount of time to do the repair. There are lower door panels available for that door that would cut the repair time in half and only have one welded seam to metal finish rather than 56. :eek: If you are a little apprehensive about doing the repair with a butt weld you could do a joggled edge or offset flange. Joggles or offsets are not the recommended for the metal finish process, but yields far better results than multiple patch repair. Now understand this is your door not a customers so the repair you choose only has to satisfy one person. :D If and when you are ready I can offer drawn illustrations to help you along the way. One rule of thumb to always remember, as you build metal thickness your concerns with expansion and contraction will be a potential problem further down the line, although filling a hole with wire feed you are more than doubling the material thickness in that area, which makes it difficult to relieve the heat affected zone H.A.Z. Now when the metal tries to move with the change in temperature the thicker areas become a problem. There you will suffer with stress areas showing in your final finish. :( But which ever way you chose keep us posted and let us help you threw the uncertain areas. :) Also as a sheilding gas of choice would be Argon CO2 75/25 mix. :) The Argon will help reduce the temperture.
 

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I agree, I have found also its easier to skin the whole door, the price of the skin will be offset by the tedious labor and time involved in half sections. The 75/25 also reduces spatter, I use the Co2 because its cheaper and have to grind anyway, I would like to think I am frugal, the ol lady says I am cheap. Another tip, skipping around on the weld seam 1-2" increments and go back and weld in between the spaces. If the door is off ,down hand welding will give you faster travel speeds and help reduce warpage and distortion.
 
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