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If 20 to 25 thousand $$ or more upgrades/repairs were put into a trifive, not including the purchase price, what percentage of that amount would be appropriate to add to the sale price. I realize it's a subjective question, but I'd like to get some perspective.
 

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1957 2 door sedan 210, (running) & 1957 2 door B/A hardtop (apart)[
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I'm certainly no expert on pricing, but I think there are many variables. First, How well are these upgrades/ repairs done? How desirable are these changes to the average buyer? Last year I bought a car with very expensive wheels and tires, which I replaced with what was more to my liking, just as an example. I'm sure I did nothing to add dollar value to the car, despite the expense. Spending big $$ for a paint job or upholstery to change color won't help value .Things like adding AC, power steering, and brakes will raise the value. For many custom costly features, not much return unless the buyer has your same tastes. Others may differ.
 

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1956 chevy 210 del rey sedan
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If 20 to 25 thousand $$ or more upgrades/repairs were put into a trifive, not including the purchase price, what percentage of that amount would be appropriate to add to the sale price. I realize it's a subjective question, but I'd like to get some perspective.
HA HA HA your assuming those expenditures actually add value, usually they don't add much and the seller add all these costs up and comes up with a number that is way out of market price range and delusional. the quality of the build and upgrades also is a huge factor. 99% of people have way more in the car than it is actually worth. for example adding a 9" ford rearend costs 2-3k but doesn't add 2-3k in value on the car and as soon as it is driven around the block the parts value is 1/2.
 

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probably depends on what shape it was in and price you paid for it to begin with.
 

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Repairs implies that something was 'broken', thus had to be repaired to bring it back to 'utility'; these costs are part of owning a vehicle and don't really add to the value; they just keep it running and 'maintain' value.

Upgrades do add value, but the actual $value of each upgrade depends on the buyer; obviously the upgrade was WORTH it to you, but may not have the same value to prospective buyers. That said, I'd try to get a return on any upgrades I'd made by adding in their cost.

All that aside: What someone has spent doesn't translate very well to what a vehicle is Worth. Ask yourself: How do I evaluate a vehicle for purchase? Others do something similar by evaluating: Originality, Condition, Cleanliness (like you're 'judging' the car).. all that tempered by how badly you want it.. :)
 

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From my perspective the amount of investment put into these once common middle class offerings will not form the basis for setting resale value. The exception to this would be the shop that builds vintage/classics or whatever for pre- determined profit, for the most part selling price of Tri-5's and the like is controlled by the market at that time. However much is spent on upgrades, modification , aesthetics or repairs ....may reflect minimally on the average but looking over the competition is probably your most honest appraisal.
 

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It doesn't matter if you're into fly fishing, backpacking, hunting, motorcycle riding or building Belairs, if you are going to recreate you are going to spend money and not make money.
Take whatever you invest into the car and multiply it by 0.30 and that is your base value.
 

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HA HA HA your assuming those expenditures actually add value, usually they don't add much and the seller add all these costs up and comes up with a number that is way out of market price range and delusional. the quality of the build and upgrades also is a huge factor. 99% of people have way more in the car than it is actually worth. for example adding a 9" ford rearend costs 2-3k but doesn't add 2-3k in value on the car and as soon as it is driven around the block the parts value is 1/2.
I actually let my 55s owner keep his junk 9 inch for a $1000 discount, built a Dana posi for a nice savings.
 

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Lots of variables. First- the car itself. If the car isn’t sought after, you will get little return (sorry, 4 door fans! I know this becomes a heated topic, but for the record, I also like some of the less widely desirable models…but value is subjective: I love hardtops and convertibles, but have little interest in owning one).

Also depends on what the improvements are. Some are widely desirable: good wiring, sound metal, good chrome, etc.. Some are not: 22” wheels, digital read out gauges, and the like. The more you spend on making the car unique, the less you can expect to get in return, usually.

As a rule of thumb? The 30% or so mentioned above is likely pretty close!
 

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Lots of variables. First- the car itself. If the car isn’t sought after, you will get little return (sorry, 4 door fans! I know this becomes a heated topic, but for the record, I also like some of the less widely desirable models…but value is subjective: I love hardtops and convertibles, but have little interest in owning one).

Also depends on what the improvements are. Some are widely desirable: good wiring, sound metal, good chrome, etc.. Some are not: 22” wheels, digital read out gauges, and the like. The more you spend on making the car unique, the less you can expect to get in return, usually.

As a rule of thumb? The 30% or so mentioned above is likely pretty close!
Well put, for some the truth is not always friendly.
 

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15 years ago a person could find clean un-molested cars and and drop 25 grand into it and recover nearly everything. Those days are long gone.

The only people making money on these cars are the folks that are paid to build them for others.

To break it down for the OP.

If we are talking about what money a person spent on parts then installed them correctly themselves (Not including what they think their labor is worth) It really depends on those parts. Drive train can in many cases recover 75% of the actual costs of those parts (LS crate motors and Tremec transmissions, even name brand built rear ends)

Interiors, and paint jobs are major losers in terms of cost recovery. You will be lucky to recover 20% of what it costs.

Rolling stock and stereos, the biggest loser in terms of retaining value.

New fresh chrome and AC are probably one of the highest returns on investment.

One thing to factor in is geographical. Location location location. the folks in the snow belt are very interested in sun belt cars, the value of that is often worthy of consideration.
 

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What the upgrades cost can vary a lot towards the value added to the vehicle. $25k spent on upgrades, but done by others, means those upgrades will likely have less value towards the car. While $25k spent on just parts, and installed at no cost by the owner, will add a lot more to the car's value.
But it's really impossible to take just a monetary value and say it adds X dollars towards the car's value, as the fact is not everyone has the same taste in modifications. What might be appreciated by some, might be disliked by others.
 

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I don't think you'll ever find a formula that correlates amount invested to the value of the vehicle. The only thing that affects value is how desirable it is to buyers and what they're willing to pay.
 

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It doesn't matter if you're into fly fishing, backpacking, hunting, motorcycle riding or building Belairs, if you are going to recreate you are going to spend money and not make money.
Take whatever you invest into the car and multiply it by 0.30 and that is your base value.
True hobbies like golf and bowling usually offer even less of a return on money spent, however some like gun or coin collecting might actually have a better return.
 

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True hobbies like golf and bowling usually offer even less of a return on money spent, however some like gun or coin collecting might actually have a better return.
I used to shoot competitive pool. I own a few cues that are worth several times what I paid for them.



Tables are even more invest-able (I never had the room for one) A 1 1/4" (five quarter) slate, eight foot pocket billiards table built in the 1920s is worth more then my 55.
 

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I used to shoot competitive pool. I own a few cues that are worth 10 times what I paid for them. A five quarter slate eight foot pocket billiards table built in the 1920s is worth more then my 55.
Not all pool tables have great resell the one in my parents basement is also a one peice slate table 60s? appears to have little resale when they attempted to sell it. Lots of interest in the light that came with it that looks like a couple pool balls. Their next door neighbors ended up leaving their old walnut Brunswick for their grand kids who bought the house.
 

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probably depends on what shape it was in and price you paid for it to begin with.
My thoughts exactly.

I had a '66 Chevelle that I completely brought back to life from a shell. I paid $500 for it, and after all of my work and additions, I got $9K for it 13 years later. I tried to sell it for $12K, and noone would reply to the ad. I know it was easily worth 12 if not more. It just always seems to be dependent upon your location, who's looking for that year car, and whether or not you're willing to ship it or drive it to them.
 

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Even when you list it on a national auction (ebay, etc), it depends on who is looking at that time. And it depends on the overall appeal of the car to the buyer, some equipment can bring a good car down. Its worth what ever someone is willing to pay, just like when you upgrade the car, you pay what ever its worth to you.
 

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The other end of it is that a number of years ago, a lot of owners who had retired with a good bit of available cash built the car they wished they could have built when they were kids. Best of everything. They have a good bit of money in them. As they have gotten older or even departed, a lot of these cars are coming on the market with the owners thinking they have a gold bar they can sell. I have seen a couple of them, middle to late 90s builds, early 2000 builds, dated in some ways (autosound cassette radio for instance, lol). Nice, really nice, but dated. And they are just not bringing the money those owers are asking.

I think Robert Haas has it right.
 
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