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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, I know this is a repeat question but can't find the info I'm looking for.

I am building a 57' and am trying to find a donor car from the salvage yard for a front end clip.

Can you guys please give me some guidance on what years/models/makes will work? Can be GM or mustang, don't really care. I am ready to start junk yard shopping.

Thanks for your help.
 

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Nate some have used the 2nd gen camaro front clips. And i have also heard of the 78-87 chevy pickup frontends being used too, although i believe this one puts the wheels outward quite a bit.
Terry
 

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when you see people talking about mustang front ends in the hot rod world they are talking about mustang II ('74-'78). But hold up a minute.. we need to figure out what track width you need.

I had a quick look around, fatman fabrications list your truck as 60.5" track wdith, which is 4" wider than a normal mustang II. They do a kit with the right track width.

There are lots of companies that make and sell aftermarket crossmembers designed to fit the truck, fatman is just one of them. They are mostly designed around mustang II geometry.

You could probably make a crossmember from an actual mustang fit, but it would probably be quite alot of work.

If you are on a tight budget and are confident with a welder there is a company called welder series, they make crossmembers (amongst other things) that are cut out of flat plate, you simply weld it together. I think they are in the $200-300 range for the bare crossmember. Be worth checking if they do one that will fit your truck.

Another option that you may not of considered is a front end from a jaguar - 70s or 80s XJ6. The crossmember actually unbolts from the jaguar and can be welded in to place in the truck, I don't remember the track width but they are quite often used over here (UK) in 50s trucks.


Camaro clips - not absolutely sure but I think its 2nd gen camaro.
 

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There are so many options here.

You have the GM clip, volare, aftermarket clips are endless from the Mustang 2 to the corvette.

If you want my opinion about a donor car my first choice would be a GM g-body 78-88 Monte Carlo, Cutless, Regal etc. The track with is more to my liking.

My 2nd choice would be a 2nd Gen Camaro or Firebird. These clips are great I just like the track width on the g-body clips a little better. The g-body's track with are a little narrower.
 

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I wouldn't touch one of those junk Mustang 2 suspensions for anything. JMHO.

I would also consider the C4 Corvette setup. It's a modular piece with the front crossmember doing the locating of the suspension components. Take a look in my Picturetrail albums.

Where are you in Colorado?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks a ton guys..

how far back do I need to measure before I cut one off at the junkyard? I know that these are elementary questions..but I'm an early 30's ford chopped top guy, and this is my first truck..

this is a budget build

also, do I want the steering with whatever I get?

thanks again.

Chevynut--I'm in Littleton
 

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cut as far back as you can get, I'd go for just in front of the first body mount - usually by the firewall, that way when fitting it to the truck chassis you can pick where you join them.
Make sure you somehow have joiner or boxing plates when you join the two chassis.
Before you cut the clip off the donor weld a piece of angle iron across the frame rails so that it doesn't move once you've cut it off. If you can't weld it then I guess nut & bolt something across - better than nothing.

I think your best option is a camaro clip from what you say. I agree with chevynut I wouldn't use a junkyard mustang clip - by the time you cut it out, make it fit, replace all the bushes, but the 11" rotors, aybe dropped spindles you won't have saved anything.

Far as steering goes the camaros use a steering box, so yes get that. I'm not too up on how the columns are coupled to the boxes in those cars, be worth doing a little research to find out.

Speak to Chevynut nicely he might do you a good price on a corvette front end, which would be pretty trick in your truck :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks Crafty...:)

much appreciated and very very helpful

Chevynut, let me know if you have any possibilities available..Thanks a bunch
 

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I wouldn't touch one of those junk Mustang 2 suspensions for anything. JMHO.

I would also consider the C4 Corvette setup. It's a modular piece with the front crossmember doing the locating of the suspension components. Take a look in my Picturetrail albums.

Where are you in Colorado?
I've heard folks say this before but never had anyone give a good reason. Could you explain why you think the mustang II or an aftermarket vendor (I assume) isn't something to consdier. There are many professionals who seem to use these with great results....why do you think they are not worth considering?
 

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The Camaro clip will put the front tires into the fender lip unless you run wheels with a lot of backspace...
 

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The Camaro clip will put the front tires into the fender lip unless you run wheels with a lot of backspace...
Most of the modern rims have a lot of backspace. The late Camaros and Corvettes for example.
Jim
 

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The Mustang II is a light car, fairly narrow track width. So it's most appropriate for transplanting into a car like that. A 50s truck isn't one of those. They are more right for 30-40s cars and trucks, which are lighter and narrower. Even then, aftermarket parts will be easier to use and offer you upgrades that aren't there with a transplant.

On the other hand, if you get pieces from an aftermarket supplier, the width problem will be solved, as well as many other little things. For one thing, you will need to upgrade the brakes from the stock Mustang II stuff.

If you want to go with a salvage yard clip, I think the 2nd gen Camaro is more appropriate.
 

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I've heard folks say this before but never had anyone give a good reason. Could you explain why you think the mustang II or an aftermarket vendor (I assume) isn't something to consdier. There are many professionals who seem to use these with great results....why do you think they are not worth considering?
Not sure what kind of weights we're talking about here, but I think the Mustang II was a fairly light car. The components may work great in 2500 lb hot rods, but I wouldn't put them in a 3500 lb truck. That said, the aftermarket stuff may be stronger.
 

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Not sure what kind of weights we're talking about here, but I think the Mustang II was a fairly light car. The components may work great in 2500 lb hot rods, but I wouldn't put them in a 3500 lb truck. That said, the aftermarket stuff may be stronger.
It seems there are a lot of these options out there: Heidts, CCP, TCI and others which use A arms and spindles similar to Mustang II and a fabricated cross member. These trucks are fairly light and if one uses modern coil overs I cannot see what the problem is. I have seen plenty of guys using this type set up....is there someone on this forum who has such? I would be interested.
There's a good dialogue here:

And a note: my research shows a Mustang II around 3200 lbs.....

http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/showthread.php?t=407913&highlight=HELIX
 

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I've heard folks say this before but never had anyone give a good reason. Could you explain why you think the mustang II or an aftermarket vendor (I assume) isn't something to consdier. There are many professionals who seem to use these with great results....why do you think they are not worth considering?
First of all, the MII is a lot smaller car than a tri5 so I don't know about the fit. I have seen the way a MII suspension is put together and I think it's a bad design. I don't like the way the upper a-arms are retained on the frame without shims. It seems to me like the adjustment can go out very easily. A friend of mine had one of these on a street rod, and I thought the whole setup was pretty hokey.
 

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I think it all depends on what your going to do with your truck. If you're just going to drive it, any of the car frontends should work fine. I want to use mine to tow or whatever so I set my truck on the 73-87 half ton frame. I think it was Terry that mentioned the track is a little wide, and it is, about an inch a side. If I leave it sitting up stock height I think it will look ok, but If I go to lowering it the only option is to narrow the A-Arms. Good to see another truck guy, show us some pics and keep us posted.
 

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First of all, the MII is a lot smaller car than a tri5 so I don't know about the fit. I have seen the way a MII suspension is put together and I think it's a bad design. I don't like the way the upper a-arms are retained on the frame without shims. It seems to me like the adjustment can go out very easily. A friend of mine had one of these on a street rod, and I thought the whole setup was pretty hokey.
If you do some research on the Heidts, Scotts Hot Rods, and others you see that they fabricate a front cross members and one has to box in the front frame rails. These trucks are fat fendered as it were but really not big trucks. My 2006 Sierra is much larger. And they are quite light. When one uses the Mustang II or similar custom, the track is changed/fabricated with crossmember to accomodate the truck's width. The better ones have considerable adjustment and would seem to be pretty high quality. I am surprised you describe it as hokey; check out the Heidts "super ride" version.

I own a C5 and believe that the A-arms in stamped aluminum are comparable to a stainless welded A arm....
By the way the c5 front end looks nice.

No one on this site has actually used an aftermarket cross member and A-arms?
 

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I thought we were talking about a stock MII front suspension. I don't know what the aftermarket ones are based on or how they are different.

What makes these "Mustang II" suspensions when they use aftermarket crossmembers, a-arms, spindles, etc.???? Is there something particular about the MII design?

Heidt's makes some nice stuff. ;)
 

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The Mustang II frontend is just easily adaptible to about any application. Most of the aftermarket MII frontends are an improved version of the original design. The rack and pinion steering is what made it so popular to use, with no steering box needed and it's easy to change from front to rear steer.
 

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The Mustang II frontend is just easily adaptible to about any application. Most of the aftermarket MII frontends are an improved version of the original design. The rack and pinion steering is what made it so popular to use, with no steering box needed and it's easy to change from front to rear steer.
Good and simple explaination (I understood this to be the case as well).

I was under the impression that the discussion was more focused on the aftermarket stuff, but from reading the initial posts again, I guess I was off track.
For the record and I guess it requires clarification, I personnally was never considering finding an old Mustang II and using the front end. And I wouldn't want to do that kind of engineering/fabrication with a stock Mustang II front end, seems others have used other clips with better success.

For my application, I am researching using one of the Heidts, Fatmain, Scotts Hot Rod or other comparable IFS designs with the weld in cross member and coil over shocks that is based on the Mustang II spindles, A-arms. Just trying to get a feel for who has used what.....
 
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