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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When doing a frame off resoration or rebuild where does one typically start? The chassis? Or replacing/repairing sheet metal on the body? Does doing one before the other make it any easier to reassemble? First time attempting a frame off project. My 55 needs complete floor replacment and a fai amount of firewall work. The frame also needs some repair work and spot patching.
Looking for input from everyone that has already been down this road and knows what lies ahead.

Thanks, Mitch:confused0006:
 

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If the frame needs extensive work, I would try to find a better frame. Work on the body. :anim_25: bowtie-trifive :gba:
 

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If you're doing it all, it doesn't really matter which one you start with (frame or body).

When we did our 56, body was sent out and we had the frame home on a rotisserie. Made it nice to flip around. Hand sanded it down to bare metal. If I had to do it over, I would have the frame powder coated.
 

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Which model you working on? Sedan, hardtop, convertible, nomad???

What lies ahead is "ALOTOFWORK" :sign0020:

Doing the floor on a rotisserie is the easiest way but you "must" brace the body before you remove it from the frame. Use the search option to find the best way to brace.

I would do the body first, frame last. I did it the other way around and wish I did it the other way around.
 

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I'm in the process of restoring my 55 210 four door. I needed a totally new frame and floor, but not fire wall (Maine winters and dirt barn floor). After about 10 minutes on the internet I found a good 56 frame. Wired brushed entire frame and did internal frame coating and chassis black (Eastwood). The one peice floor (Ecklers) was painted as a separate unit not attached to anything. It's a long process, and as Doc said Lots of work!
 

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If you are doing a frame off, it doesn't matter which is done first if it's just clean and paint.

But if you have structural repairs to make, do them first before you separate body and frame, or as you do. Put another way, if your floor braces and/or inner rockers are rust damaged - the frame is the best jig you can have to assure that your repairs fit. Sometime a good way to do that is to lift the body up and use some spacers between body and frame so that you have access to make your repairs and still use the frame as a jig.

Bottom line, every car is a bit different depending on the level of repair needed.
 

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Bottom line, every car is a bit different depending on the level of repair needed
Just make sure you are geared up with equipment to actually do the work.

I have seen so many running cars that need work taken off the road and are yet to be put back on the road, some remain in parts, some parts are never found :anim_25:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. It's a 210 sedan. The body needs the most work. It was a Michigan car which uses a lot of salt in the winters on the roads. The floor and door sills are pretty rusted out.

Appreciate the advise guys.....:tu
 

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"Brace the body, BRACE the Body, BRACE THE BODY" ... before ever attempting to remove it...you'll save yourself a world of headache:sign0020:

I've always done the frame first, get it completed and in some cases drivetrain installed...of course these have been hot rods like Model A's and a Vicky or a Cobra replica.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, Bill you win this one. Mine is bad but not quite as bad as your was. How long did it take you to replace it all once you got started? :tu
 

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Mitch
I have it at a shop where their body man did all the welding work. Since I had a newer frame, I was able to work on that without any inhibitions of the body being in the way. My son and I were able to manipulate the frame quite easily. They braced the body and (four of the guys) lifted it off the old frame when I wasn't there. The timing between going to blast and on the new refurbished frame was 4 months. I'm not sure on howmany hours as it was worked on full time. The shop lets me come and work on it as much as I can. Mostly with items I can't get in trouble doing.
I've been blasting and painting lots of small stuff, i.e. horn, fan, heater, trim, etc. Here is how it looks now...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Looks good so far Bill. It's a major plus having a body man as a good friend. I could use one of those myself. Thanks for your input and keep me posted on your progress. I'm just getting ready to start on mine so I get to follow in your footsteps. Take lots of pictures too.

Mitch:shakehands:
 

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Mitch, I sent you a PM (private message). When you log in look, at the "Welcome Mitch" box and it should have a link to the PM.
 

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When I had the body off the frame two years ago, I fixed some small rot, had the frame straightened, and then powder coated, and rebuilt all the other stuff. Was really fun working on the bare frame. If I had to do it over again, I think I would blast the frame clean and por 15 and topcoat. The powder did not get into all the nooks and crannies, particularly on the crude frame welding. I ended up having to touch up the missing spots with the por 15. I will say this though, once you have a nice clean, painted frame, and the body has a nice clean painted floor installed and is back on the frame, you will marvel at just how nice it is to work on the car without getting completely filthy dirty, just a little dirty, lol.
 
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