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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. Got all my shoes and cylinders installed on the Nomad and am starting to run brake lines for the new booster and master cylinder.

My only question is which one of these bracket setup work better or are they about the same

heres what Im looking at



or this one, forgive the ebay link

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180118457147&viewitem=&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWAX%3AIT


I like the mount in the ebay link but was wondering if anyone else is using this set up...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hey guys, Im asking about the bracket on the back of the boosters, not the boosters itself....
 

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Bracket

The style I'm using is like the bracket in the first pic. I found that a booster setup from 70 camaro was a direct fit to the 55's original bolt pattern. Only slight mods required
 

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The Ebay unit is 7" and has a "flat" bracket. The 7" booster lacks boost but you make up for that somewhat with the 1" master cylinder and the fact that you keep the stock pedal ratio. With the small m/c and stock pedal ratio you will have a lot of stroke on the pedal. If your engine doesn't make a lot of vacuum this booster won't be enough, at least to suit most. I have seen a setup like that work well with a stock late model TPI engine, which makes a lot of vacuum.

The booster in the photo in your post appears to be an 8" single diaphragm booster, with an angled bracket. It will have more boost. With the angled bracket, you usually have to drill a new hole in the brake pedal arm 1" down from the original, and this changes your pedal ratio from 6:1 to 4:1. This kills some of your boost. If you have the usual 1-1/8" master cylinder, that kills some boost too.

You may want to consider an 8" dual diaphragm booster.

The other thing about the brackets is this. With the angled bracket, this moves the booster up relative to the engine and helps it clear the valve cover. I don't think the flat bracket and a big booster will clear in many situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Ebay unit is 7" and has a "flat" bracket. The 7" booster lack boost but you make up for that somewhat with the 1" master cylinder and the fact that you keep the stock pedal ratio. With the small m/c and stock pedal ratio you will have a lot of stroke on the pedal. If your engine doesn't make a lot of vacuum this booster won't be enough, at least to suit most. I have seen a setup like that work well with a stock late model TPI engine, which makes a lot of vacuum.

The booster in the photo in your post appears to be an 8" single diapragm booster, with an angled bracket. It will have more boost. With the angled bracket, you usually have to drill a new hole in the brake pedal arm 1" down from the original, and this changes your pedal ratio from 6:1 to 4:1. This kills some of your boost. If you have the usual 1-1/8" master cylinder, that kill some too.

You may want to consider an 8" dual diaphragm booster.

The other thing about the brackets is this. With the angled bracket, this moves the booster up relative to the engine and helps it clear the valve cover. I don't think the flat bracket and a big booster will clear in many situations.
thanks, This is what I was looking for. My motor doesnt make alot of vacuum so this is something to consider. Thanks....
 
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