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Looking for a good epoxy primer to spray on the bare metal once I strip the paint. What is your process for cleaning the metal before you spray it as well?
 

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I use mostly PPG products in my shop, but PPG epoxy pricing has gone through the roof over the last couple of years. I started using Kirker epoxy a couple of years ago and I am very happy with the product. Comes in three color choices. Very durable and easy to work with. Make certain You are using a decent respirator while using any paint products...VERY IMPORTANT! Use a good wax and grease remover or 3812 on your bare metal. I use a scotchbrite pad with the solvent prior to spraying the epoxy. :)
 

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Hands down...SPI epoxy primer...Just follow the directions at their website...Additionally they are phenomenal at answering their phone...Been doing business with them for years.
 

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Don't think you can beat SPI epoxy & definitely can't beat the customer service I'm no body man or painter I learned about SPI 13 years ago while doing a frame off on my 65 vette after a near total crash SPI is very big with the corvette crowd I've also used they're clears on my last three cars been very happy with SPI
 

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Hands down...SPI epoxy primer...Just follow the directions at their website...Additionally they are phenomenal at answering their phone...Been doing business with them for years.
So, you've tried them all, and SPI was the best? What attributes did it have that other epoxy primers didn't have?

I've used SPI, and I didn't see anything special about it. I can tell you this, it was the most finicky epoxy primer I've ever used, in terms of surface prep needed.
 

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I use Nason Ful-Poxy. You mix it 50/50, wait 30 minutes, then shoot. Aside from making sure there's no grease or oil on the metal, no surface prep is required. I've sprayed it over steel that was treated with Ospho.......it doesn't care. Sticks just fine.
 

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unless things have changed in the last couple years you call SPI with a order & they're products are sent free shipping to your door in just a couple days metal prep sand with 80 grit if I remember correctly Ospho is recommended if metal treatment is necessary on badly pitted metal but had to be cleaned really well before applying SPI epoxy
 

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Several things at play here.

The original PPG DP primer was good stuff and the price was pretty reasonable. Then it became DPLF (lead free) and many thought that took away from its advantages. Then as time went on the price kept climbing. That was not remarkable in itself, the price of all paint and primer has steadily risen over the last 15-20 years. It was never formulated for high build/block sanding. About the only sanding you can do is to scuff it after thorough curing before applying something else. But that is not something that PPG really ever meant to be - their recommendation is to apply a different product within the "window" so that you never actually sand the epoxy primer. When you sand it, it loads the paper and you really need to just scuff with something relatively coarse like 180 or 220 after a full cure.

One huge thing about SPI primer is that you can sand it, even use it as a build primer and block sand it, and you don't have to wait that long. The price is much lower and the customer service is excellent.

The Nason primer still has the limited sanding capability even if the price is much better.
 

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I have used dp50 and not impressed with it. Was looking to try something else.
 

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Prep work is more important than which epoxy primer I use. I almost always take cars down to bare metal, and then get them sealed as soon as possible before they flash rust. But before I shoot any sealer I go over the whole car with a scotch brite pad on my angle grinder. Then I wipe it down with degreaser, and follow that with tack cloth just before spraying. And I don't scrimp on tack cloths and try to wipe too much metal with one cloth. If I see much "color" on the cloth I grab another and continue.
I've used multiple name brand epoxy primers, and all worked well if mixed properly, and room temps were correct for the reducer and catalyst temps I was using.
 

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Its not always needed, but SPI is very solvent resistant after full cure. DPLF epoxy by PPG can be wiped off with lacquer thinner after full cure. SPI is also much thicker per coat, and their black epoxy is more UV resistant than any other epoxy.
 

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I've used about every epoxy primer out there. Like Rick said the PPG series DP original epoxy was very good. The DPLF is terrible, adhesion is poor and you had to apply primer or top coat over within 24 hour or had to rescuff first, As well as the price is way up there.

Nason is ok, but the incubation waiting period doesn't fly in my shop. Works better as sealer before paint than an epoxy on bare metal.

Dupont's series is ok, but time consuming as well. Lays down fairly flat to reduce sanding needed. Again the price is up there.

SPI applied too dry for my liking and sanded poorly. Their build primers were similar. Price was low compared to others.

Sherwin Williams had adhesion issues while blocking it out.

Valspar (and House of Kolor) Epoxy's work very well, lays down beautifully, no incubation or wait times, can apply high build primer directly over it after 20 minute flash time (just as you would paint). Advantage is you can use it as DTM epoxy or as a sealer before paint just by adjusting the mix ratio. Second advantage is you can get it in various colors to set up your base foundation before painting which will save you on Amount of paint applied to achieve full color coverage. Price wise is medium.

A lot depends on the sprayer, incubation times, re-coat windows and the amount of work you want to do after the application.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have heard good things about Valspar and DaBeer paints from someone I know who owns a body shop. So far from my research a lot of people are recommending SPI but a few people who have experience using many different brands are recommending something else.
 

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Valspar (and House of Kolor) Epoxy's work very well, lays down beautifully, no incubation or wait times, can apply high build primer directly over it after 20 minute flash time (just as you would paint).
Is this the VP50?
 

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For a laymen, trying to get product can sometimes be a bit of a challenge. I used TCP DTM epoxy primer on the 57 when I fixed and painted the inside of the trunk. Shot ancient Dupont centari I found online. did that in 2015, no issues. I used TCP because I could order it directly on line and it would be shipped to my home. Some places would not ship to a residence, had to be a business. The TCP was fine but clogged the paper if you wanted to sand it (clogged both wet and dry). I have used House of color epoxy primers and they are pretty good, expensive, but pretty good. I recently got a gallon of black SPI primer and it seems to work just fine, at least for this backyard hacker. Sprays nice enough for what I need, nice sheen, nice build. I have not sanded the stuff yet but we shall see. Nice adhesion.

I wanted to purchase it directly, called, and apparently they don't sell direct so we had to call a distributor who then shipped it to us. No issues shipping to a residence.
 

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Advantage is you can use it as DTM epoxy or as a sealer before paint just by adjusting the mix ratio. Second advantage is you can get it in various colors to set up your base foundation before painting which will save you on Amount of paint applied to achieve full color coverage. Price wise is medium.
This is all true of SPI, except price wise is low.
Is it possible that your dry spray problem with SPI might have been too small a tip? I use a 1.3, but they recommend a 1.4. Actually I think Tamco epoxy is just as good, and it lays down very smooth, but this door was done with SPI black epoxy.

 

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I use Matrix MP 200 DTM (direct to metal) Primer, MP 210 DTM Primer Sealer and MP 3 High build primer.

All 3 are urethane. They all sand well. I don't have abrasive buildup with regular "sandpaper" but I switched to a Mirka dustless vacuum system for my DA Sanders which uses a "net" style abrasive versus paper backed.

Never tried SPI, TCP or Tamco but I swear by Matrix MS 42 high solids clear.
 

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I've used about every epoxy primer out there. Like Rick said the PPG series DP original epoxy was very good. The DPLF is terrible, adhesion is poor and you had to apply primer or top coat over within 24 hour or had to rescuff first, As well as the price is way up there.

Nason is ok, but the incubation waiting period doesn't fly in my shop. Works better as sealer before paint than an epoxy on bare metal.

Dupont's series is ok, but time consuming as well. Lays down fairly flat to reduce sanding needed. Again the price is up there.

SPI applied too dry for my liking and sanded poorly. Their build primers were similar. Price was low compared to others.

Sherwin Williams had adhesion issues while blocking it out.

Valspar (and House of Kolor) Epoxy's work very well, lays down beautifully, no incubation or wait times, can apply high build primer directly over it after 20 minute flash time (just as you would paint). Advantage is you can use it as DTM epoxy or as a sealer before paint just by adjusting the mix ratio. Second advantage is you can get it in various colors to set up your base foundation before painting which will save you on Amount of paint applied to achieve full color coverage. Price wise is medium.

A lot depends on the sprayer, incubation times, re-coat windows and the amount of work you want to do after the application.
Just so people reading this will understand the terms correctly, its called "induction period", not "incubation period". The induction period is the time interval needed to start a crosslinking reaction between the epoxy base and the catalyst. I've used it as a moisture barrier on bare metal and as a sealer before paint for many years, with excellent results. I recently discovered that it also wet sands nice.
 
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